Item #1145 Four association copies: The Machinery of Nature; The Golden Door; A World of Wounds; Population, Resources, Environment. Paul Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Thomas Lovejoy, Stephen J. Gould, Donald Glaser, Joseph Tydings, signed, inscribed to.
Four association copies: The Machinery of Nature; The Golden Door; A World of Wounds; Population, Resources, Environment
Four association copies: The Machinery of Nature; The Golden Door; A World of Wounds; Population, Resources, Environment
Four association copies: The Machinery of Nature; The Golden Door; A World of Wounds; Population, Resources, Environment
Four association copies: The Machinery of Nature; The Golden Door; A World of Wounds; Population, Resources, Environment
Four association copies: The Machinery of Nature; The Golden Door; A World of Wounds; Population, Resources, Environment
Four association copies: The Machinery of Nature; The Golden Door; A World of Wounds; Population, Resources, Environment

Four association copies: The Machinery of Nature; The Golden Door; A World of Wounds; Population, Resources, Environment

Various: Various. First editions. Hardcover. A collection of four books by renown populations biologist and public intellectual Paul Ehrlich, all significant association copies inscribed respectively to Stephen J. Gould, Thomas Lovejoy, Nobel-winner Donald Glaser, and US Senator Joseph Tydings. Ehrlich is best known for his deeply influential and controversial book The Population Bomb (1968) about overpopulation and resource scarcity, a topic which has defined his career and perhaps overshadowed his distinguished achievements in ecology and conservation biology (including classic butterfly studies). The book was called alarmist by some, but Ehrlich years later said that "perhaps the most serious flaw in The Bomb was that it was much too optimistic about the future." Here are four books that followed The Population Bomb, listed by earliest publication; several are co-authored by Paul Ehrlich's wife Anne Ehrlich (who is often under-recognized in their important partnership), and the first is also inscribed by Anne: 

1) Paul Ehrlich and Anne Ehrlich. Population, Resources, Environment: Issues in Human Ecology. San Francisco: Freeman and company, 1970. Inscribed on the title page to Joesph Tydings, former Democratic US Senator from Maryland from 1965-1971: "Joe--I think you know how much my colleagues and I appreciate your unflagging support. A few more senators like you and we may all live to see the year 2000. Fight on! Paul." An inscription from Anne follows: "Looking forward to meeting you someday soon--Anne Ehrlich." Uncommon signed, with no other copies available online as of this writing. The book is described as "the first comprehensive, detailed analysis of the worldwide crisis of overpopulation and the resulting demands on food, resources, and the environment. Taking a broad ecological aproach, the Ehrilichs demonstrate that problems of modern society such as environmental deterioration, hunger, resource depletion, and war are closely interconnected and that together they constitute a challenge without precedent in human history."  Tydings was an environmentally-minded Senator and is mentioned on page 288 of the book in relation to bill he introduced to establish an office of environmental quality that could review and delay environmentally damaging federal projects. Several years after the publication of this book, in1972, he also argued Eisenstadt v. Baird before the Supreme Court, the decision of which legalized birth control for single persons, something previously illegal in many states. A near fine book with some sunning to edges of endpapers; in a very good plus jacket with some light curling, creasing, wear, small nicks to edges. 

2) Paul Ehrlich, Loy Bilderback, and Anne Ehrlich. The Golden Door: International Migration, Mexico, and the United States. NY: Ballantine Books, 1979. First edition. Inscribed to Thomas Lovejoy: "To Tom, with warm regards and admiration, Paul and Anne." The inscription is in Paul's hand, but Anne has signed separately. Laid in is a bookseller's posthumous bookplate. Lovejoy is known as "the godfather of biological diversity," having introduced the term in 1980, and helped shape the field of conservation biology. This book by the Ehrlichs and their coauthor examines the immigration question from all sides. Near fine with faint foxing to text block faces in a very good jacket with sunning to spine and modest wear to corners. 

3) Paul Ehrlich. The Machinery of Nature. NY: Simon and Schuster, 1986. Inscribed to Nobel prize-winner Donald Glaser: "For Don, with best wishes. This was developed to explain population biology to non-scientists -- some of our butterfly work is explained in Chapter 2 and coevolution in Chapter 4. Paul." Uncommon signed, with no copies available online as of this writing. Glaser was a physicist at UC Berkeley who won the Nobel in 1960 for his invention of the bubble chamber, which is used for studying high energy beams in a particle accelerator, thus expanding our knowledge of the subatomic universe. Subsequently he left physics behind (a bold move!) to focus on molecular biology and genetics, a field in which he also made important contributions, and this is perhaps where he overlaps with Ehrlich. This book is Ehrlich's exploration of ecology, for "non-scientists" as he writes in the inscription. Apropos of the collection on offer, both Thomas Lovejoy and Stephen J. Gould (and their work) are discussed in this book. A fine book in a fine jacket. 

4) Paul Ehrlich.  A World of Wounds: Ecologists and the Human Dilemma. Oldendorf/Luhe, Germany: Ecology Institute, 1997. Number 8 in the Excellence in Ecology Series, editor O. Kinne. First edition. Inscribed to Stephen J. Gould: "For Steve, with warm regards and admiration." Laid in is a bookseller posthumous bookplate. Stephen Jay Gould is considered one of the most influential popular scientist writers of the 20th century. An evolutionary biologist, in his field he’s known especially for his theory of “punctuated equilibrium,” which holds that evolution operates through times of rapid, extreme change (e.g. the Anthropocene) followed by relative stability. He was the winner of the National Book Award in science in 1981 for The Panda’s Thumb: More Reflections in Natural History and a finalist for the same award the following year for The Mismeasure of Man, which did win the National Book Critics Circle Award. This book from Ehrlich "reviews and analyses essential aspects of modern ecological research and its bearing on society and on related sciences" and it "represents a culmination point of Paul Ehrlich's professional career." With an introduction by the editor and a "laudatio" by Harold Mooney.  210 pages. A near fine book in glossy printed boards without dust jacket, as issued; slight bumping to spine ends and corners. 

Altogether a great (starter) collection of Ehrlich's work and notable associations. Near fine / Very good. Item #1145

Price: $2,750.00 save 5% $2,612.50